Spotlight On Sport

Author: 
G. St. C. Scotter
Date Published: 
1935-11-18
Source: 
Jamaica Gleaner

The Trinidad Programme

The Trinidad football team will be here for roughly a fortnight and the programme of play arrange for them calls for eight matches, all to be played in Kingston.

The matches will be as follows:

Three vs All Jamaica, one vs Combined Schools, one vs Combined Military, one vs Kingston Club, one vs St. George's Club, one vs Y.M.C.A. All the matches to be played at Sabina Park.

This is I think everyone will agree a very satisfactory programme, in fact a better one could not have been arranged—the only possible objection to it being perhaps that it means rather too strenuous a time for our Trinidad friends.

However that can easily be remedied, for if they find eight matches in two weeks a bit too much for them, it is quite easy to drop out one or other of the Club matches.

The All Schools game will be the first on the programme, and should be an attractive one too; for although School football is not very strong this year, the boys are all keen and fit, and will do their best, and it gives thema chance of experiencing international football for the first time.

Owing to the shortness of the visit it is obviously impossible to send the team down to the country; and I think the selection of Sabina as the venue for all the games will be generally popular, as its Stand lay out is easily the best of any ground for the convenience of the spectator.

Who Will Play For Jamaica

Jamaica will be able to put a fairly good side on the field against the invaders at any rate from an attacking point of view—though the defence, if Hadden does not play for Jamaica will not be good.

In Capt. Harvey, Alty Sasso, and MacKenzie, the Island possesses three scoring insiders as good as anything it has had in its football history—the wing men may give the Selectors a bit of trouble; but Huntley DeCosta's fine play this season on the right wing should solve that side for them at any rate.

The half line is a big difficulty. Addis of Kingston and Hitchens of St. George's are the obvious selection for the wings, and both are useful, hard working players but they are not brilliant, and will not have the assistance of a really first-class centre half; which will make the line as a whole, a decidedly ordinary one if opposed to the fast lot of forwards such as I fear Trinidad possesses.

The centre half position is a real problem—candidly I think the Selectors will have to choose a younger player in the place of the great veteran "Pinkie"—and the best of the available talent seems to me to be Woolcock of Wembley.

If the team is to be at its best we simpky must have Hadden at back—the Association have got to realize that, with Myers practically a crock this season, and Passailaigue playing out all the time, our back division will be a real weakness unless Hadden plays.

Between the sticks we have the choice of three really good men. Clarence Passailaigue, Clinton Nunes, and Johnny Groves.