T&T football in a spin as Warner quits

Date Published: 
2001-12-31
Source: 
Jamaica Gleaner
Page: 
B2

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, CMC

THE resignation of influential CONCACAF president Austin Jack Warner as adviser and financier of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFF) has left the body with a huge task of securing financial assistance to keep the services of Brazilian football coach Rene Simoes.

Warner, a FIFA vice president and the driving force behind the sport in the Caribbean for the last decade threw in the towel at the weekend after having to fend off a series of criticism about his influence on the sport in the twin island republic.

Warner's resignation was considered and accepted by the TTFF's Executive Committee at a meeting on Friday when members unanimously expressed disappointment with his decision to sever all ties with football in Trinidad and Tobago.

"I'm now re-examining my involvement in local football which will give other people including my critics a chance to help and perform effectively and contribute financially. They said Jack was the problem so now I'm out," Warner said as he announced his resignation.

As a result of Warner's resignation the TTFF now has to look for US $50,000 per month (TT $300,000) to cover the salary of Simoes and his assistants.

TTFF President Oliver Camps made it clear that the republic's dream of a World Cup qualification depends a great deal on the retention of Simoes and his team.

Towards this end the Federation has agreed to pursue the possibility of keeping Simoes services as Technical Director and has called on the Government, corporate citizens and individuals to support the call for the resources needed.

Simoes along with three other Brazilians, [illegible], [illegible] and Francisco Santos have been working with the national side since May with assistance from former Strike Force members Clayton Morris and Michael Maurice plus manager George Joseph.

Camps disclosed that Warner had paid for the services of Simoes and his team over the past seven months.